CEPHALOTUS

 

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Cephalotus follicularis

A SINGLE SPECIES

Cephalotus follicularis

 

USUAL NAME

Albany pitcher plant

FAMILY

Cephalotaceae

 
History and etymology

Archibald Menzies discovered the plant in 1791. But J. J. H. de Labillardiere named the plant in 1806 when he saw the singularity of stamens which reminded him a head. Kephalôtos comes from the Greek "fitted head".

Distribution

Endemic to the southwest Australia, Cephalotus grow in a small area that extends on the south of the city of Albany to Bunbury.

Biotope

Enjoying proximity of the ocean, Cephalotus sites have a Mediterranean climate less pronounced. The rains are numerous and can exceed 200 cm per year. In the peat swamp on the edge of ponds in the shade of trees or shrubs, sometimes the sun, that grows the plant. The basement with acidic pH is kept moist by water that runoff under the surface. Drosera and Utricularia as well as Leptospermum grow in the same biotope.

Description

Small perennial plant, 5 to 8 cm tall.

The leaves are of two types: some are green, lanceolate, without any possibility of capture, the other are pitchers that trap prey.

Traps are formed by the urn-shaped leaves topped by a lid, which attract insects with their nectar. They  slip into the bottom of the pitchers, where bacteria and enzymes digest them.

The prey are especially ants, but also Diptera, Coleoptera ...

The white flowers are hanged by a scape tall enough(over 50 cm) and are without petals. Their size is small: 0.5 cm in diameter.
Frightening Cephalotus

Cephalotus 'Hummer's Giant'

The flowers

genlisea.jpg

drosera_mod2.jpg

utricula_mod2.jpg

 




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